Canal du Centre

Canal du Centre

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Abbeville and St. Valery sur Somme

We weren’t going to take the boat all the way to St. Valery sur Somme, where the Somme meets the sea. The last 15 k to the sea lock is straight and no locks. We didn’t like the idea of getting Oldtimer too close to salt water and we heard that the available mooring on the freshwater side of the sea lock were in short supply (that turned out to be untrue). Another concern is the influence of tides on that end of the canal. The water level can change quite a bit over a day so tying up can be a challenge. We decided we’d do the trip by bicycle from Abbeville. 
We arrived at the Abbeville moorings about noon. They were full but we were able to tie up alongside another boat for an hour or so until a boat left and room became available dockside. Off we went to wander the town.
A massive German bombing raid destroyed most of Abbeville in World War II and the restoration of the town left it rather bland architecturally but there did seem to be lots going on; not another “dying village of France.” Most of the shops were occupied and there were plenty of busy bars, cafes and restaurants. Also several good boulangeries, always a good sign. There was a big supermarket just a couple hundred feet from the moorings, a bonus for those of us without cars.
Tuesday morning we unloaded the bikes and headed for St. Valery. Since it’s along the canal and a well paved bike path, it only took us about 45 minutes to get there. We locked the bikes up at the tourist office and wandered off into town. 
St. Valery is a typical seaside resort town but very old (stop me if you’ve heard that before). One section, called the Medieval Village, still retains some of it’s old defensive walls and the ponds that were water sources then. Up on the hill, there’s a great view across the Baie de Somme.



What used to be a busy fishing port is now mostly a harbor for small yachts.


We also saw the flock of salt marsh sheep, so special they have their own appelation.


After our stroll about town we enjoyed a big lunch at a local hotel/restaurant and then decided to take a train ride.
In 1887 a narrow gauge steam train line was opened around the bay from Noyelles sur Mer to Cayeus sur Mer, passing through Crotoy and St. Valery. It carried tourists to the seaside resorts and also the bay’s local products. In the 1960’s competition from trucks put the line out of business but in 1970 a group of railroad enthusiasts decided to bring it back. Now, the group has 5 coal-fired steam locomotives and a bunch of old restored carriages that carry tourists around the bay. We took the trip from St. Valery to Crotoy and back, about 3 hours total. Oh, the carbon offsets we’re responsible for now!


One engine shifts ends of the train.


Another engine goes by.


Around the bend is the back of the train.

Back on the bikes we headed downwind back to the boat. Wednesday morning we’d begin retracing our steps back toward the Canal du Nord and further south into France.




1 comment:

  1. So lovely to find your blog, Cathy Jo and Don! I'm so sorry we missed seeing you on the Somme. I'm afraid we only got as far as Corbie as we really wanted to do the Canal de Roubaix again and were running out of time. It would be wonderful to cross canals with you again! So many thanks for your kind reception at Wambrechies and again at Douai. I hope you've had some wonderful cruising, or faring as I call it :) I'll add your blog to my list and hope to keep in touch!

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